Impact of the revision of the TA-Luft on the valve industry

Man is testing a valve according to revised TA-Luft emission standard.

The revised TA-Luft Emission Standard will refer to ISO 15848-1 to protect the general public and the neighborhood. And to prevent harmful effects on the environment caused by air pollution. All that in order to achieve a high level of protection for the environment as a whole.

In my blog post, I would like to explain what impact this change will have on the valve industry.

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Cryogenic valves for LNG application – Part 2

Cryogenic valves - LNG application.

In our second part of the cryogenic valve series I would like to responsive on questions like “What are the challenges of using cryogenic?”, “Selecting a valve for cryogenic service.”, “How can engineers ensure tightness of cryogenic valves?” and “What should engineers pay attention to during assembly of cryogenic valves?”.

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Cryogenic valves for LNG application – Part 1

Cryogenic valves - LNG application.

One of our customers needed a primary isolation valve for a pressure measurement on a container ship. The ship uses natural gas power. The valve had to meet the Fire Safe API requirements. It also had to pass a cryogenic test with liquid nitrogen (-196 ° C). The container ship rides under the American flag. Thus, an independent examiner had to administer the test. This examiner came from the American Bureau of Shipping (ABS) and the US Coast Guard.

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Valves in extreme cold: 3 criteria are decisive

Arctic operation valves for extreme cold.

Whether in Alaska, Norway or Russia: Industrial valves, such as those used in chemical plants or the oil industry, are exposed to extreme cold as low as -55°C in some regions. However, not all industrial valves are suitable for operation in extreme cold. Three criteria are decisive.

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Does the seal ring fit? Avoid bad surprises.

Does the seal ring fit? Avoid bad surprises.

Direct mount manifolds for direct mounting on pressure and differential pressure transmitters are normally protected against overheating by hot process media by means of correspondingly long impulse pipings. Nevertheless, many users demand that the manifolds and their flange connection to the transmitter can easily withstand even higher temperatures. For this, the manifolds must be equipped with gaskets made of graphite. This means they can easily be used at up to 550 degrees Celsius – much more than required by the current EN 61518 / IEC 61518 standards.

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